2400, Assessment Process

2410 Overview of the Assessment Process

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

The purpose of the assessment process is to determine whether the applicant meets all eligibility requirements, including:

  • financial eligibility;
  • functional eligibility; and
  • having an unmet need for services.

The assessment process should produce a case record that clearly documents the results of the case worker's determination. All processes that can be performed in the Service Authorization System Online (SASO) Wizards must be performed in the system to consider that action complete, including:

  • Form 2059, Summary of Client's Need for Service;
  • Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide; and
  • Form 2064, Eligibility Worksheet.

Lack of case record documentation in the following areas is considered inadequate, unless the case is being denied for an unrelated reason.

Example: The case worker conducts a home visit in response to an intake request. After completing the Form 2060 assessment, it is determined that the individual's score is too low to qualify for any of the requested services. Since the individual has already been determined functionally ineligible, it is not necessary to evaluate financial eligibility. If an Application for Assistance form has been completed, the form must be retained in the case record.

 

2411 Required Documentation

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

The following must be documented in the case record:

  • Individual's eligibility based on his categorical status in the Texas Integrated Eligibility Redesign System (TIERS) or current financial and functional status (Form H1200-EZ, Application for Assistance – Aged and Disabled; Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide; Form 2064, Eligibility Worksheet).
  • Individual's medical, social, environmental and/or physical conditions that are relevant to his particular functional status (Form 2110, Community Care Intake; Form 2059, Summary of Client's Need for Service, Form 2060 and the case narrative).
  • Individual's degree of self-sufficiency and the tasks he can perform (Form 2110, Form 2059 and Form 2060).
  • Environmental adaptations that are being used or could be used to help the individual achieve or maintain his maximum level of self-sufficiency (Form 2059).
  • People who are resources, including family, friends and community networks, that the individual now uses or who are available to perform or help with activities of daily living (Form 2059 and Form 2060, Part A).
  • Agency resources in the community available to provide any of the services needed by the individual (Form 2059 and Form 2060, Part A)
  • Form 8001, Medicaid Estate Recovery Program Receipt Acknowledgement, for Community Attendant Services applicants or responsible parties.

In some areas of Texas, the Area Agency on Aging may submit a completed Form 2060 based on the assessment for services it provides. If a completed Form 2060 is received, it must be reviewed for information as part of the assessment process.

Note: For detailed explanations of financial eligibility assessment and determination procedures, see Section 3000, Eligibility for Services.

 

2420 Assessing the Applicant's Needs

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

During the initial home visit, as required in Section 2300, Responding to Requests for Service, the case worker completes the following assessment procedures.

 

2421 Review of the Community Care Intake Form

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Review Form 2110, Community Care Intake, for all relevant information. Make sure the practitioner is the applicant's current practitioner and the name, address and telephone number listed are correct. If the applicant provided a rural route address, ask for the updated street address. If the individual states he does not have a new address, continue to use the address provided. Take no action if the street-style address is not provided. Ask the individual to update his information with the Texas Health and Human Services Commission if he is notified by the U.S. Postal Service of a new address.

Verify that the responsible party is the primary contact for the applicant and the name, address and telephone number are correct. On Form 2110, list any other family members or informal supports who can be contacted if the applicant cannot be reached. Review the requested services and address those during the interview and in documentation.

 

2422 Form 2059, Summary of Client's Need for Service

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

The purpose of Form 2059, Summary of Client's Need for Service, is to document the applicant's:

  • medical diagnosis and physical condition;
  • functional limitations;
  • home environment;
  • living arrangements; and
  • family and community supports.

Record all information reported by the applicant or informal supports during the home visit on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet. This information is entered into the Service Authorization System Online Wizards (SASOW) and will generate Form 2059.

Carefully observe and use interviewing skills during the initial home visit and throughout the assessment process. This is necessary to collect critical information about the individual's functional and mental abilities, and community and family resources. Individuals may demonstrate functional abilities while responding to questions about their home and living environment or medical problems. They may reveal information about family resources while responding to questions about financial eligibility. They may reveal intellectual and developmental disabilities or lack of mental clarity in the way they respond to questioning throughout the interview. During the interview, be alert for any indications of abuse, neglect or exploitation. If any of these conditions are present, refer the individual to the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS), Adult Protective Services.

 

2422.1 Medical Diagnosis and Functional Limitations

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Ask the applicant for information regarding his medical diagnosis and physical and functional limitations. Record this information on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet.

 

2422.2 Home Environment

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

The individual's functional status is always relative to the home circumstances in which the individual performs the activities of daily living. For example, the individual may have physical limitations that would not affect his abilities to perform certain personal care tasks if he lived in a home complete with all modern conveniences. If, however, his home contains only minimal household equipment, his inability to perform his personal care tasks could be compounded. Always assess an individual's functional capacity in relation to the home environment in which the tasks are performed daily. Service plans are developed to be carried out in specific home environments and each plan should relate specifically to a functional assessment done in that particular environment.

Observe and ask questions about the individual's home and immediate environment to assess his ability to perform activities of daily living. Determine whether the environment affects the individual's ability to perform these activities or otherwise affects his health and safety.

Guidelines for Assessing the Home Environment

Using the following guidelines, assess the home environment and document the results on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet, to be entered in the Service Authorization System Online Wizards (SASOW). When observing the individual's home and immediate environment, assess the following:

  • Does the structure of the house or dwelling create an environment that is safe and adequate for the individual's unique needs?
  • Are there assistive devices and equipment necessary for the individual to live safely or that would improve his safety? Note: These include ramps, grab bars, wide doors, lowered light switches and adequate light for safe visibility.
  • Is the home clean enough and orderly enough to be safe for the individual's lifestyle?
  • Does the home pose any critical health hazards?
  • Does the individual have neighbors who are or might be resources to help with any special monitoring the individual might need because of some unique health or physical problem?
  • Is the neighborhood safe to allow the individual to move safely in and out of his home as needed?
  • Is the individual safe from physical harm in his own home?

Home Arrangement

Is the individual the owner of his home or does he reside in an apartment or live with friends or relatives? The individual may pay rent, own the home or live cost free.

Is the individual homeless and no friend or relative is available to provide a home? If the individual has insufficient income to rent a suitable home, he may be living in a public shelter or an exposed setting. Refer the individual to Adult Foster Care (AFC), Residential Care (RC), public housing or other community living resources. A referral to Adult Protective Services (APS) may be needed.

Home Condition

Is the individual's home:

  • Adequate — Physically safe and arranged or equipped so the individual lives safely and performs normal activities of daily living? Although adjustments may be desirable, they are not necessary for safety.
  • Inadequate Questionable — Residence presents serious limitations in conducting activities of daily living and/or safety hazards exist because of a need for major repairs, addition of utilities or assistive devices. Check the appropriate boxes on Form 2059-W.
  • Inadequate Unsafe — Residence is an unsafe environment for the individual. The structure is in a severe state of disrepair, contains critical health hazards or prevents one from performing the normal activities of daily living. The individual may need to be moved for his health and safety. A referral to APS may be appropriate. Check the appropriate boxes on Form 2059-W.

 

2422.3 Living Arrangement

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

The case worker documents on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet, Item 4, if the applicant lives alone, with a spouse, with family or friends, or if he is in adult foster care or a residential care facility. In Item 5, list the name and relationship of all household members and indicate with a "Y" that they are in the household. Note if any of the household members receive services or are applying for services.

 

2422.4 Documentation of Caregivers

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Ask the individual if he receives assistance with his activities of daily living and list the name and relationship of all caregivers. These people may be family members, friends or neighbors. List the tasks performed by each caregiver on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet. Under Caregiver Status, indicate if there is a reason the caregiver cannot meet all of the individual's needs, such as working full time, ill health, needing caregiver support or providing continual care. For household members who are not performing any caregiver tasks, leave the caregiver status blank. If a household member states he is unwilling to assist the individual with any tasks, note this in the Caregiver Status on Form 2059-W.

The caregiver will be assessed during the functional assessment. See Section 2433.1, Assessment of the Caregiver.

Determine if the caregiver needs caregiver support as defined in Section 2512, Caregiver Support, and develop the service plan accordingly.

 

2422.5 Attendant Policy for Individuals Transferring from Another Personal Attendant Services (PAS) Program

Revision 18-1; Effective June 15, 2018

For individuals applying for Community Care Services Eligibility (CCSE) personal attendant services (PAS) and the caregiver has been the paid attendant in that program, the following guidelines must be applied to individuals who are transitioning from the following programs:

  • Individuals who are no longer eligible for STAR+PLUS or the STAR+PLUS Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) program, who are being assessed for Primary Home Care, Community Attendant Services or Family Care; and
  • Individuals transitioning from the Texas Health Steps Comprehensive Care Program (THS-CCP) Personal Care Services (PCS).

The applicant must meet the unmet need criteria like any other applicant, but the current circumstances will be considered.

During the initial interview, if the caregiver has been the ongoing paid attendant and would like to continue as the paid attendant, the case worker will ask the caregiver the following question: "Would you continue to provide care if you are not being paid to provide the care?"

If the response is "No," determine the tasks for which the caregiver has been paid in the previous program and whether the individual still needs assistance with those tasks. Determine which tasks will continue as caregiver tasks and develop the service plan accordingly. Document the caregiver's response and send Form 2067, Case Information, along with the referral packet, to the provider advising that the caregiver had previously been the paid attendant and is eligible to be the paid attendant.

If the response is "Yes," evaluate if there is any unmet need or if caregiver support is required. If services continue, the caregiver cannot be hired. If there is no need for caregiver support or no unmet need, the applicant is denied services.

The case worker must follow this policy for individuals applying for HHSC Primary Home Care (PHC), Community Attendant Services (CAS) or Family Care (FC) who are transitioning from one of the programs listed above.

 

2422.6 Common Household Tasks, Duplicate Services and Services Provided to Other Family Members

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

If an individual lives with others, do not purchase services that duplicate services normally provided as part of the household routine. For example, meal preparation, shopping, laundry and housekeeping for the individual are performed daily as part of the family routine. Unless the individual has unique needs, these tasks will not be purchased.

If an individual lives with others, determine whether he has needs for unique tasks that are performed apart from the household's tasks and whether performing these tasks imposes additional burdens of time and responsibility on the household members. Unique tasks are attributable to the individual's problems. Examples include incontinence, a need for a special diet, food preparation, extra shopping or special housecleaning caused by the individual's behavior. Allowable tasks also include cleaning up after personal care tasks, cleaning the individual's room and the bathroom used by the individual. If it is determined the individual's needs impose special and extra activities on the household members, document these needs on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide.

Services Provided to Other Family Members

Identify whether services are being provided to any other family member by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) or another agency. If services are being provided, assess whether they meet some of the individual's needs and would affect his service plan.

Example: An individual's spouse receives Community Care for Aged and Disabled Family Care services and an attendant performs housecleaning, laundry and meal preparation as part of that service plan. Some of those services also benefit the individual or duplicate services that he needs. In this case, divide the time for common tasks between the individuals and authorize the task for both individuals. Refer to the maximum times listed on Form 2060 for companion cases.

Refer to Section 4400, Family Care Services, and Section 4600, Primary Home Care and Community Attendant Services, for specific information about situations in which two persons in the same household receive attendant services.

 

2422.7 Assessment of Social and Community Resources

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Assess the individual's community and social network resources, such as churches, civic clubs and voluntary affiliations to determine whether any of these entities provide services or would be able to do so. Also, identify available service agencies that serve the elderly and disabled and might be able to provide a service needed by the individual. Always determine whether any of these sources can help the individual before services from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) are authorized. See Appendix XV, Services Available from Other State Agencies, for assistance in identifying alternate sources of assistance. When possible, refer to local resource directories for information about services in an individual's community. Document the use of or referral to other service agencies on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet, Item 7.

All other services available to the individual must be considered and used before HHSC services are authorized.

 

2423 Guardianship

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

A Community Care for Aged and Disabled individual may need a guardian if he:

  • appears to be incompetent; or
  • is so incapacitated that he is unable to care for himself or manage his property and financial affairs.

If the individual's incompetence or incapacity results in his being in a state of abuse, neglect or exploitation, the case worker must make a referral to Adult Protective Services (APS). Unless ordered by a court to do so, the case worker must not file a petition for guardianship or assume guardianship of the person or the estate of a Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) individual.

If the court intends to appoint the case worker as guardian, the case worker must advise the court that serving in that capacity will violate HHSC policy. If the case worker is appointed guardian by the court, the supervisor and regional attorney must be notified immediately. If a referral to APS, Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, has not already been made, one should be made at this time.

 

2430 Functional Assessment

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

40 Texas Administrative Code §48.2907(a) — The Client Needs Assessment Questionnaire is used to determine an individual's functional need for CCSE services.

Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, is used to make several determinations regarding the individual's eligibility. The completed form will determine:

  • the individual's functional eligibility;
  • his ability to carry out activities of daily living;
  • what he should continue to do for himself to maintain his current level of self-sufficiency;
  • what he cannot do for himself because of physical limitations, mental limitations or both;
  • which resources are available to help with specific tasks;
  • if the individual has an unmet need; and
  • how much service the individual will receive, if eligible.

An individual's functional level is based on:

  • his physical condition;
  • his medical problems and the functional limitations they impose;
  • his mental clarity and limitations and the effect they have on performing activities of daily living; and
  • the condition of his home environment.

The age of the individual being assessed for services should not be considered when determining the level of functional need. For example, the applicant is a 3-month-old infant whose mother is applying for Community Attendant Services (CAS) for the child. Obviously, the infant will need help with most of the activities of daily living and would, therefore, score a "3" on those tasks. The fact that the functional need is the direct result of the individual's age should not be taken into consideration when assigning a score for the particular task.

If the person appears to be eligible for Community Care for Aged and Disabled services on the basis of age, income and resources, and he requests services beyond Information and Referral, complete Form 2060, Part A, to determine the functional eligibility for services. This assessment helps determine whether the person has functional needs, what kinds of functional limitations he experiences, which tasks he needs help with and whether his mental clarity contributes to his need for help.

 

2431 Form 2060, Part A, Functional Assessment

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Program Standard: The case worker must score each item on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, Part A, Functional Assessment, and then accurately compute the total score to determine whether the individual is eligible for Community Care for Aged and Disabled services. Use the spaces under each item, as needed, to explain the person's limitations or his accommodations for his disability. For detailed information about scoring Form 2060, Part A, refer to the form instructions. Appendix XVII, Service/Score Code Guide, indicates the score requirement for each service.

During a face-to-face interview, ask the individual each question on Form 2060, Part A, as the question is stated on the form. Then, ask further questions to gain a more complete understanding about the degree of the individual's ability or inability to carry out activities of daily living. Careful assessment of the individual reveals what he can do for himself, what he should continue to do for himself to maintain his current level of self-sufficiency, and what he cannot do for himself because of physical limitations and/or mental limitations. When conducting an assessment, use the following scale of disability and follow the detailed definitions of impairment levels found in the instructions for Form 2060, Part A.

0 = No impairment. The individual is able to conduct activities without difficulty and has no need for assistance.
1 = Minimal/mild impairment. The individual is able to conduct activities with minimal difficulty and needs minimal assistance.
2 = Extensive/severe impairment. The individual has extensive difficulty carrying out activities and needs extensive assistance.
3 = Total impairment. The individual is completely unable to carry out any part of the activity.

To determine the severity of the individual's impairment, consider the following factors:

  1. Individual's Perception of the Impairment — Does the individual view the impairment as a major or minor problem?
  2. Congruence — Is the individual's response to a particular question consistent with the individual's response to other questions and also consistent with what has been observed?
  3. Individual History — Probe for an understanding of the individual's history as it relates to the current situation and the individual's attitude about the severity of the impairment. For example, has the individual always kept a messy house and is not, therefore, concerned because he is unable to perform housekeeping tasks? Has the individual always eaten only one meal a day and is not, therefore, interested in eating more often? How has the impairment changed the individual's lifestyle?
  4. Individual's Right to Self-Determination versus Danger to Self — Consider the consequence to the individual if he chooses not to take medications, bathe, adhere to a special diet, etc.
  5. Lack of Facilities — Absence of facilities for bathing, laundry, telephone calls or meal preparation may indicate an impairment. The impairment and its degree will depend on the individual's accessibility to the facility, ability to use the facility and ability to make satisfactory accommodations in the absence of the facility.
  6. Adaptation — If the individual has adapted his physical environment or clothing to the extent that he is able to function without assistance, the degree of impairment will be lessened, but the individual will still have an impairment.
    Note: Medication is not considered an adaptation to the individual's functioning in the same way a walker would be. The individual is not considered to have an impairment if the medication is working. The individual is rated on how he is functioning at the time of the interview, regardless of the status of taking medication.

The following chart provides a general guide for assessment. Whether the individual is taking medication, forgetting or refusing medication, or taking medication incorrectly, he is still assessed on his current level of functional ability.

Situation: The individual has problems with dizziness and balance, which could affect scoring on the transfer/ambulation and balance questions.

If the individual: then:
is taking medication and has no problems with dizziness, score 0 on impairment.
is taking medication but still has occasional episodes of dizziness, score 1 on impairment.
is taking medication, but still has major problems with dizziness and balance, score 2 on impairment.
has a prescribed medication, but is forgetting to take the medication or is taking the medication incorrectly, the individual is still assessed based on his current level of functioning.

The case worker must clearly document the reason in situations where the task score on Form 2060 is clearly inconsistent with the amount of time allotted for that task. For example, a case reader may decide to rate Standard 10 unmet if an individual scores 1 on all Form 2060 tasks, yet the maximum amount of hours for each are purchased and case documentation does not explain the discrepancy.

 

2432 Scoring Persons Who Cannot Respond

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

On some occasions, the case worker may need to assess small children, infants or individuals who are comatose or otherwise non-responsive. Use Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, to conduct these assessments, even though the instrument may not seem to apply. Allow the caregiver to respond if the individual cannot do so. In scoring each item, use the caregiver's response, the case worker's observations and any knowledge the case worker may have about the individual from other sources.

 

2433 Determining Unmet Need in the Service Arrangement Column

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

40 Texas Administrative Code §48.2907(b) — Regardless of a client's functional eligibility as determined by his score on the client needs assessment questionnaire he receives CCSE services only if he has an unmet need for those services.

Unmet need is defined as a requirement for assistance with activities of daily living that cannot be adequately met on an ongoing basis by friends, relatives, volunteers or other service agencies.

For any task listed on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, the Service Arrangement Column will determine if the individual has an unmet need in order to determine the individual's overall eligibility based on unmet need. Review questions 1 through 15 and ask the individual the following additional questions.

If the impairment score is "1" – Ask the individual if he is able to perform the task by himself, even though it may be difficult for him.

  • If the answer is "Yes," enter "S" in the service arrangement.
  • If the answer is "No," ask the individual who helps him with this task. If the individual states that a caregiver assists him, enter "C" for "Caregiver" in the service arrangement. List the caregiver's name, relationship and task on Form 2059-W, Summary of Individual's Need for Service Worksheet, if it is not already entered.
  • If the individual states he receives help from another agency, enter "A" for "Other Agency" in the service arrangement. List the name of the agency on Form 2059-W.
  • If the answer is "No" and the individual states he has no help from any source and needs help to perform the task, enter "P" for "Purchased" in the service arrangement.

If the impairment score is "2" or "3" – Ask the individual if he receives help with this task.

  • If the answer is "Yes," ask the individual who helps him with the task. If the individual states a caregiver helps with the task, enter "C" for "Caregiver" in the service arrangement. List the caregiver's name, relationship and task on the worksheet, Form 2059-W, if it is not already entered.
  • If the individual states he receives help from another agency, enter "A" for "Other Agency" in the service arrangement. List the name of the agency on Form 2059-W.
  • If the answer is "No" and the individual states he has no help from any source and needs help to perform the task, enter "P" for "Purchased" in the service arrangement.

If the individual states he receives some help from others but it does not meet all of his needs for a specific task, enter "P/C." Document the part of the task performed by the caregiver in the "Tasks Performed" section on Form 2059-W.

 

2433.1 Assessment of the Caregiver

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

For each task marked "C" on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, assess the capability, dependability, availability and willingness of the caregiver. Consider and discuss family and job responsibilities, as well as the physical demands of caregiving. For each task, determine by observation and by asking the applicant or caregiver the following questions:

  1. Is the caregiver physically and mentally able to perform the task?
  2. Is the caregiver dependable in performing the task on the required schedule?
  3. Is the caregiver available at the time the individual needs the task performed (either scheduled or on demand)?
  4. Is the caregiver willing to perform the task on a regular and ongoing basis?

It may be necessary to talk with the applicant's current caregiver in order to accurately assess his contribution to the applicant's care needs. If the caregiver cannot join the applicant for the initial face-to-face visit, get as much information as possible from the applicant and contact the caregiver by telephone to verify that the caregiver is willing to provide the tasks. Do not delay service initiation if the caregiver cannot be reached.

If, for any task, it appears the caregiver is not able to adequately meet the applicant's needs, discuss with the applicant if some or all of the task should be purchased. If the applicant states the caregiver is currently performing the task, but it is apparent from case worker observation that the task is not being adequately performed, discuss if the task should be purchased.

Be sensitive to any indications of abusive or neglectful behavior on the part of the caregiver and make a referral to Adult Protective Services, if necessary.

 

2433.2 Exploring Other Resources for Meeting the Applicant's Needs

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Explore other possibilities for resources with the individual. Ask if family members pay someone to help the individual and if the current assistance is adequate. Use observations about the caregiving arrangement to determine whether needed tasks are being adequately performed. If an individual's need for help with a particular task is being adequately met and the assistance can reasonably be expected to continue, do not authorize purchased services for that task. If the need for help with a particular task is not being met or is only partially met, ask the individual and family if there is anyone who would voluntarily provide the needed help. Explore the use of any identified volunteers. If voluntary help cannot be obtained, explore the use of community resources and consider service options from other groups or agencies. See Section 2535, Involvement of Volunteer Resources, and Section 2530, Other Resource Services, for possible resources to meet the individual's needs. If the individual's need for help cannot be met in any other way, enter "P" for the task on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide. If Home Delivered Meals is the only service being purchased, complete the service arrangement column and do not allocate time on Form 2060.

If an individual's needs for help are now being met and the individual or family determines the present care arrangements cannot be continued, inform the individual or family that the individual may reapply for services when the current arrangement is discontinued. If, during the initial interview, the individual or his family knows the present care arrangements will discontinue within 30 calendar days, proceed with the application process.

Examples:

  • An individual's sister, who is providing the care, has taken a job and will begin work on a specified date.
  • A live-in relative, who is providing the care, plans to leave town on a certain date.
  • A family member has been paying a caregiver but will soon be unable to continue because of new financial obligations, which will begin on a certain date.

If someone who has been paying for care intends to discontinue the arrangement on a specific date within 30 days, proceed with the application. Otherwise, offer to take an application at the time the care arrangement is discontinued. If someone will continue to purchase some of the care, determine if the applicant has an unmet need for any additional care. If someone is willing to pay for services only while the individual is on an interest list, this does not affect the individual's unmet need for services purchased by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC). However, if someone is willing to pay for services after the individual comes off the interest list, there is no unmet need.

In some situations, a caregiver may quit employment to stay home and provide care for the applicant and is requesting to be the paid attendant. In this situation, the case worker must obtain verification that the individual quit employment within 30 days before or after the application date. The caregiver may be considered as a potential attendant. In the Service Arrangement column of Form 2060, note the tasks that the caregiver will voluntarily provide and those tasks that will be purchased. See Section 2513, Caregiver as the Paid Attendant, for additional information.

This policy also applies for ongoing cases in which a caregiver has been working full time and quits employment to stay home and provide care for the individual. The case worker must obtain verification that the individual quit employment within 30 days of the request for the change.

When the Service Arrangement Column of Form 2060 is completed, review the results to determine if the individual has an unmet need. If all responses are "S," "C" or "A," the individual has no unmet need and is not eligible for services. Advise the individual he is not eligible at this time and may reapply if his circumstances change. Be sure to adequately document this information in the Service Authorization System Wizards with the appropriate denial code and send the applicant Form 2065-A, Notification of Community Care Services.

If there are tasks marked "P" on Form 2060, continue to the Task/Hour Guide section.

 

2434 Support Score and Establishing Priority

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

If an applicant for Primary Home Care (PHC), Family Care (FC) or Community Attendant Services (CAS) has a functional score of "3" and the service arrangement for a priority task (feeding, toileting, transfer, meal preparation) is a "P," then a support score must be entered for these tasks on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide. Determine the likelihood of that task being done if the attendant does not show up during a normally scheduled service shift. Using the following scale, enter the score in the Form 2060 Support Score box by the appropriate item.

1 = It is very likely that the task would be done even if the attendant does not show up.
2 = The task will probably be done if the attendant does not show up.
3 = The task will probably not be done if the attendant does not show up.
4 = It is very unlikely that the task will be done if the attendant does not show up.

In determining this support score, do not consider caregivers as available if they would be at work or school, even if they could come to the individual's home if the attendant was not there. Do not enter a support score for an item if either the task is not purchased or the individual's score for that task is not "3."

If the support score is "4" on any of the priority tasks, then the individual will be designated as a priority individual. See Section 2540, Priority Status Individuals, for further information.

 

2440 Use of Form 2060, Part B, Task/Hour Guide, and Part C, Task/Minute and Subtask Guide

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

For all personal attendant services (PAS) cases, the case worker uses Part B and Part C of Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, to determine the quantity of purchased services needed by an individual.

The Part C, Task/Minute and Subtask Guide, provides a uniform approach in the authorization of services based on a minute range per task and impairment score. Each impairment score for each task has a minimum and maximum time that can be allotted. It is mandatory to follow the minute guideline and check the subtasks for each task as a way of documenting the type of assistance needed and to support the time allocated for that task. See the Form 2060 Instructions for complete directions for completing the form.

Form 2060, Pages 1-5, must be manually completed during the home visit initial assessment for an applicant who will receive PAS. Review the Task/Minute and Subtask Guide at each reassessment and initial the form. When there is a change in hours, either complete a new Form 2060 manually or update the current Part B and Part C.

Refer to Form 2060, Part C, for guidelines on the number of minutes to be allowed per task. The amount of time allowed for any particular task should be determined by taking into account:

  • the amount of assistance the individual will usually need;
  • the availability of anyone else to assist with the task;
  • which specific subtasks (activities) need to be purchased;
  • environmental/housing factors that may hinder (or facilitate) service delivery; and
  • the individual's own unique circumstances.

Discuss fully with the individual each service task to determine whether he needs assistance with that task, how much time is required to perform each task, and how often each week the task must be performed. The total time allowed for each task must be within the minimum and maximum time limits for the impairment score, as indicated on Form 2060.

Negotiate service authorizations with individuals to reach an agreement about:

  • the number of tasks and activities for which the individual needs assistance;
  • how often the assistance is needed; and
  • the amount of time needed by the provider to carry out those tasks and activities per week.

All appropriate subtasks must be checked to indicate the specific tasks the individual needs. An individual scoring a 2 or 3 may need all subtasks under the impairment score for 1 and additional subtasks under the impairment score of 2. The time allotted must be within the range for the impairment score.

Time outside the minute range (either above or below) may not be allotted without documented supervisory approval.

 

2440.1 Requesting Supervisory Approval for Time Outside the Minute Range

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

In situations in which the individual has extenuating circumstances and requires a deviation in the time range, the case worker may request supervisory approval to authorize time above or below the minute range for the task and impairment score. The case worker must document the reason why the individual requires minutes outside the range for the task/impairment score level. The documentation is sent to the supervisor in writing or electronic mail (email) and the supervisor must approve or disapprove in writing or by email. The documentation and the supervisor's response must be filed in the case record.

 

2441 Circumstances When Supervisory Approval is Not Required

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

In some situations, the individual may have extenuating circumstances and a compelling reason that require subtasks in a lesser impairment score to be authorized for a task. The two situations in which the case worker may allot time for subtasks in a lesser impairment score without supervisory approval are:

  • if the individual has extenuating circumstances and is requesting only subtasks in a lesser impairment score; or
  • if the individual has a caregiver or other agency providing some of the subtasks.

The case worker documents the individual's extenuating circumstances and the reason tasks in a lesser impairment score are authorized, or documents the part of the task the caregiver or other agency provides.

 

2441.1 Exception for a Compelling Reason

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

In some situations, an individual may request tasks not be performed for him even though he has an impairment and may not be able to perform the task for himself.

If an individual has a compelling reason for not wanting any of the subtasks under the appropriate impairment score, but only wants subtasks listed in a lower impairment score, the case worker must document the individual's request and allocate minutes in the minute range for the subtasks selected. The case worker must document the reason, and no supervisory approval is required.

Example: The individual scores a 2 on bathing. She needs assistance with drying. However, when discussing subtasks, she states she would like standby assistance for safety and drawing of water, all under the impairment score of 1. She states her skin is very sensitive and she would not allow help with drying as she is afraid it would hurt her. The subtasks checked are all under the impairment score of 1, so ten minutes is allowed. Documentation is required to explain the variance. No supervisory approval is required.

See Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, and Instructions, for additional information.

 

2441.2 Exception for Assistance from a Caregiver or Other Agency

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

If an individual has a caregiver or other agency performing part of a task and only subtasks in a lower impairment score are needed, the case worker must document the individual's request and allocate minutes in the minute range for the subtasks selected. The case worker must document the reason and the part of the task the caregiver or other agency performs. No supervisory approval is required.

Example: The individual scores a 2 for bathing, but only wants assistance with laying out supplies and drawing water because her daughter provides all hands-on assistance with the bathing task. The task is marked P/C. The subtasks under the impairment score of 1 are checked and ten minutes is allowed for the subtasks to be purchased. Documentation is required to explain the variance.

 

2441.3 Time Allocation for Companion Cases

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

For companion cases, time allocated for general household tasks, including cleaning, shopping and meal preparation, is based on the companion minute range on Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, rather than the individual range. Time is assigned per individual based on the individual's impairment score. Check the box(es) in the Total Minutes Per Week column for cleaning, meal preparation and/or shopping to indicate that time is authorized for these tasks to the companion case. In situations where there are more than two companions in the household, assign time based on the individual's impairment score using the companion minute ranges.

In situations where there are more than two individuals in the household, the case worker continues to use the companion minute range based on the individual's impairment score.

Example: On cleaning, Mr. Jones scores a 3 and Mrs. Jones scores a 1. Mrs. Jones can do some light housekeeping, but due to her husband's incapacity, he needs all cleaning tasks performed in his area. Mrs. Jones is allowed the maximum of 45 minutes under impairment score 1 in the companion range. Mr. Jones is allowed the maximum of 180 minutes under impairment score 3 in the companion range.

See Form 2060 Instructions for additional examples and guidance on companion cases.

 

2442 Calculation of Time to be Authorized

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

Use the following procedures to calculate the total amount of time needed each week.

  1. Multiply the number of minutes needed to conduct each task by the number of times the task will be conducted each day to reach a daily total of minutes for each task. Times must be shown in five-minute increments. If necessary, round the time up to the next five-minute increment.

    Example: If an individual needs meal preparation twice a day and the meal preparation requires the maximum amount of time, multiply 30 minutes by two to reach a daily total of 60 minutes.
  2. Multiply the daily total of minutes for each task by the number of days per week the attendant will conduct that task. Again, times must be shown in five-minute increments and rounded up to the next five-minute increment, if necessary.
  3. Add the required weekly minutes for all tasks and divide the total by 60 minutes to determine the weekly total in hours.
  4. Round the weekly number of hours to the next highest half unit to determine the number of units to be authorized. Example: If an individual needs 7 hours and 10 minutes of service each week, authorize 7.5 units of service. The number of hours must be correctly rounded up to ensure accurate authorization of services.

Use Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide, to calculate the hours of service to be purchased. The correct number of hours must be authorized on Form 2101, Authorization for Community Care Services. Write comments in the Service Authorization System Online (SASO) "Impairment Scoring" window in the Functional Wizard.

Tasks/services identified as needing to be purchased must be authorized on Form 2101. Tasks marked "P" in the "Service Arrangement" column of Form 2060 must also be marked on Form 2101. The meal preparation task may be marked "P" on Form 2060 and not marked on Form 2101, as long as the individual is receiving home-delivered meals. A separate Form 2101, authorizing meals, is sent to the home-delivered meals agency.

 

2443 Balancing Incentive Program, Level II Assessment

Revision 17-1; Effective March 15, 2017

The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP) provides additional Federal Matching Assistance Percentage (FMAP) funds to states that initiate reforms to increase nursing home diversions and access to non-institutional long-term services and supports. As part of the effort to increase access to additional federal funds and meet BIP requirements, the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) administers the Level II Assessment to all individuals requesting or receiving Primary Home Care (PHC), Community Attendant Services (CAS) and Day Activity and Health Services (DAHS) Title XIX. The Level II Assessment consists of:

  • Part A of the Functional Assessment of Form 2060, Needs Assessment Questionnaire and Task/Hour Guide; and
  • Form 2060-B, Needs Assessment Addendum.

The BIP was created by the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and improves the state’s ability to serve more individuals by increasing access to non-institutional long-term services and supports. The BIP allows states to adhere to the integration mandate of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as required by the Olmstead decision.

The case worker will complete the Level II Assessment, Form 2060-B, for initial assessments, annual reassessments and for a significant change request for a new service.

For changes in services, the case worker will complete:

  • Form 2060, Part A, Functional Assessment, if applicable;
  • Form 2060, Part B, Task/Hour Guide;
  • Form 2060, Part C, Task/Minute and Subtask Guide; and
  • Form 2060-B.

The following are examples of the forms that are completed when a request is made for a change in service:

Examples:

  • Example A – An individual receiving CAS calls the case worker requesting transportation assistance. The case worker will complete Form 2060, Part A and Form 2060-B. Form 2060, Part B and Part C, would only need to be completed, if applicable. In reviewing the required forms, the individual is only requesting transportation and does not wish to have the service plan for his attendant care services changed. The case worker will send a referral for transportation only. No other action is required.
  • Example B – An individual receiving CAS calls the case worker requesting home-delivered meals. The case worker will complete Form 2060, Part A, and Form 2060-B, and, if applicable, Form 2060 Part B and Part C. In reviewing the required forms, the case worker places the individual’s name on the Home-Delivered Meals Interest List and also increases the time allotted for meal preparation for his attendant services. The case worker will complete the change per Section 2721.4, Revising the Service Plan, and Section 2721.6, Authorizing and Documenting Changes.

The case worker determines whether a referral is needed for HHSC services or non-HHSC services based on the information collected from Form 2060-B. The case worker discusses and obtains approval to make a referral with the individual to non-HHSC services. Referrals may include:

  • Behavioral Health Services;
  • Supported Employment/Employment Assistance;
  • Transportation Assistance;
  • assistance with instrumental activities of daily living; and
  • assistance for other medical conditions not previously addressed.

The case worker documents the referrals made on behalf of the individual in Section III of Form 2060-B, including any need for referrals that were identified but refused by the individual. No data entry is required in the Service Authorization System Online (SASO) resulting from the completion of the Form 2060-B only.

The individual retains the right to participate in the development of his service plan and the right to refuse all or part of any services and to be informed of the likely consequences of such refusal, which include referral to non-HHSC services.

Identified needs for referrals agreed to by the individual are considered as requests for information and referral. The case worker makes use of applicable existing referral policy to assist the individual with the appropriate referral located in:

Referrals for behavioral health needs identified on Form 2060-B may be made to local mental health authorities using the local phone numbers available at: https://hhs.texas.gov/services/health/mental-health-substance-abuse.