Appendix IV, Texas Model for Menu Planning

Revision 21-1; Effective December 1, 2021

 

Minimum Requirements Model to meet one-third of Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) and U.S. Dietary Guidelines for America based on combination of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Eating Plan:

 

Minimum Number of Servings for Meat

Food Group Type Total servings per day if one meal is provided. Total servings per day if two meals are provided. Total servings per day if three meals are provided.
Lean Meat and Meat Alternatives three-ounce equivalents four to six-ounce equivalents six to eight-ounce equivalents

Serving Information

One Ounce Meat and Meat Alternate Equivalents:

  • One ounce cooked lean beef, veal, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey or fish
  • One egg
  • One-half cup cooked legumes. Legumes or beans can be counted as a meat alternate or as a vegetable but cannot be counted as both in meeting the meal pattern requirement.
  • One ounce low-fat natural cheese, such as swiss, cheddar, muenster, parmesan or mozzarella, and processed American cheese. Cheese can be counted towards milk or milk alternative but cannot be counted as both in meeting the meal pattern requirement.
  • One-half cup tofu (bean curd)
  • One-fourth cup low-fat cottage cheese
  • One ounce canned tuna or salmon packed in water

Instructions

Provide:

  • Meats low in fat. Meats should be oven baked, broiled, grilled or roasted.
  • Fish as frequently as feasible. Fish is a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

Limit:

  • Processed, smoked, cured meat, or a high sodium content meat or meat alternate to no more than one three-ounce serving per week.
    • Examples: cold cuts, ham, hot dogs, canned tuna or salmon and sausage.
  • Cheese to no more than three ounces per week because of high sodium content.

 

Minimum Number of Servings for Fruits and Vegetables

Food Group Type Total servings per day if one meal is provided. Total servings per day if two meals are provided. Total servings per day if three meals are provided.
Fruits and Vegetables Two to Three servings Six servings Eight servings

Serving Information

  • One-half cup cooked, canned, or chopped raw vegetables and fruits
  • One cup leafy raw vegetable such as lettuce or spinach
  • Three-fourths cup 100% fruit or vegetable juice
  • One whole fruit such as medium apple, banana or orange
  • One-eighth melon
  • One-half grapefruit
  • One-fourth cup dried fruit
  • Starchy Vegetables:
    • One small potato or one-half large potato
    • One-half cup sweet potatoes or yams
    • One-half cup corn kernels, winter squash, peas or lima beans

Instructions

Provide:

  • Food sources high in vitamin A – A minimum of three times per week if serving meals on five or more days per week or two times per week if serving meals fewer than five days per week.
    • Examples: apricots, beet greens, broccoli, cantaloupe, cherries (red, sour), chili peppers (red), greens, asparagus, nectarines, peaches, peas, peppers (sweet red), purple plums (canned), prunes, winter squash, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, pumpkin, dark green or orange vegetables and mixed vegetables
  • Food sources high in vitamin C – Daily.
    • Examples: asparagus, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cantaloupe, cauliflower, grapefruit or juice, greens, honeydew melon, okra, orange juice, sweet red and green peppers, pineapple or juice, potatoes (baked, broiled, steamed), instant potatoes fortified with vitamin C, spinach, sweet potatoes, strawberries, tangerines, tomatoes, turnip greens, and low sodium vegetable juice
  • Food sources high in potassium – Daily.
    • Examples: apricots, bananas, beans, broccoli, cantaloupe, carrots, cucumber, lima beans, oranges, potatoes, raisins, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and watermelon
  • Food sources high in fiber – Daily.
    • Examples: beans or legumes, berries, fruits with skin, green peas, potatoes with skin, squash with skin

Limit:

  • Juice to one serving per meal.
  • Starchy vegetables to one serving per meal.
  • Canned vegetables with sodium or salt to one serving per meal.
  • Canned soups or bouillon with sodium.

 

Minimum Number of Servings for Grains

Food Group Type Total servings per day if one meal is provided. Total servings per day if two meals are provided. Total servings per day if three meals are provided.
Grains two servings four servings six servings

Serving Information

  • One or one-ounce equivalent bread or grain product
  • One-half cup cooked cereal, pasta, noodles
  • One-half cup cooked rice
  • Three-fourths cup dry cereal
  • One slice of bread
  • One-half English muffin, bun, small bagel, or pita bread
  • One six-inch tortilla
  • One and one-quarter inch square cornbread
  • One two-inch diameter biscuit or muffin
  • Four-six crackers
  • Three-fourths cup ready-to-eat cereal

Instructions

Provide:

  • Whole grain products as much as possible. At least one-third of the grain servings provided under this food group type should be from a whole grain fiber rich source.
    • Examples: brown rice, bran or bran enriched food, or whole grain bread or product

Limit:

  • Quick breads such as cornbread, biscuits, and muffins to once per week due to a higher fat and sodium content.

 

Minimum Number of Servings for Milk or Milk Alternate

Food Group Type Total servings per day if one meal is provided. Total servings per day if two meals are provided. Total servings per day if three meals are provided.
Milk one serving two servings three servings

Serving Information

  • One cup Vitamin D fortified skim, 1% or 2% low fat milk
  • Eight ounces low fat yogurt (vitamin D fortified preferred)
  • One cup soy beverage fortified with vitamin D and calcium
  • One one-half ounce natural cheese
  • Two ounces processed cheese
  • One cup pudding made with fortified milk
  • One cup juice fortified with vitamin D and calcium

Instructions

Provide:

  • Food with the lowest fat content when possible.

Limit:

  • Natural and processed cheese and unfortified yogurt as an alternate since these products are not vitamin D fortified.

 

Optional Number of Servings for Desserts

Food Group Type Total servings per day if one meal is provided. Total servings per day if two meals are provided. Total servings per day if three meals are provided.
Desserts See instructions below See instructions below See instructions below

Serving Information

  • Desserts are optional and serving is based on type of dessert served

Instructions

Provide:

  • Nutrient rich desserts that include fruit, whole grains, low-fat milk products, or products with limited sugar to count toward meeting the appropriate food group required servings.
    • Examples: apple crisp with oatmeal topping, low-fat pudding, canned fruit, gelatin with fruit, ice cream or frozen yogurt

Limit:

  • Desserts to once per week if one meal per day is served.
    • Examples: cakes, pies or cookies

 

Optional Number of Servings for Oils or Fat

Food Group Type Total servings per day if one meal is provided. Total servings per day if two meals are provided. Total servings per day if three meals are provided.
Oils or Fat No more than one serving No more than two servings No more than three servings

Serving Information

  • One teaspoon soft margarine made from unsaturated oils
  • One teaspoon oil, such as olive, peanut, canola, safflower, corn, sunflower, soy and cottonseed
  • One tablespoon mayonnaise
  • Two tablespoons salad dressing

Instructions

Provide:

  • Oils or fats infrequently.

Limit:

  • Total fat to no more than 30% of total calories. Provide an oil or fat serving only to enhance the flavor or presentation of the meal. Eliminate all sources of trans fat from the meal planning.

 

Optional Number of Servings for Other Foods

Food Group Type No specified recommendations per meal No specified recommendations per meal No specified recommendations per meal
Other Foods      

Serving Information

  • Low fat gravies, sauces, condiments, mustard and catsup

Instructions

Provide:

  • Optional foods to make up more calories as needed, enhance the flavor of the meal or help maintain holding temperatures.
  • Low or lower sodium and lower fat products when selecting optional foods.

Limit:

  • Foods high in sodium.
    • Examples: canned soup or bouillon, prepared cooking sauces, pickles, olives, processed foods, salted foods or soy sauce